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How to Recycle Grin Toothbrush

Posted by Simon Cooper on


Grin exists to reduce the environmental impact of disposable, plastic toothbrushes. I started Grin for that reason and my goal is to continue improving Grin to become the world's most environmentally friendly toothbrush. 

FYI: Each year, more than 3 billion plastic toothbrushes are disposed of. That’s equivalent to the weight of over 5,500 yellow school buses.  

Off to a Good Start

Grin was designed to be a premium quality, eco friendly toothbrush. Our unique aluminum handle is not only super hygienic, but also 100% recyclable. Aluminum and glass are 2 of the only completely recyclable materials, meaning they can be recycled infinitely without losing quality. 

By keeping the handle, we have reduced the amount of plastic used to only 4 grams, compared to roughly 25 grams for a disposable plastic toothbrush. That means that 6 Grin toothbrushes uses as much plastic as 1 drugstore model. 

Right now, our toothbrush heads are made of plastic and (unlike most drugstore disposables) can be recycled.

Because we only use a single type of plastic in our toothbrush heads, all you need to do to recycle the brush head is remove the bristles using a pair of pliers. It only take a few minutes – simply grab each tuft with pliers and pull hard.

Note: most community recycling programs do not recycle Nylon, but we are currently looking into recycling programs for our brush heads. The same is true for most bamboo toothbrushes—the Nylon bristles are not recyclable. (More on how Grin compares to bamboo toothbrushes right over here.)

Can you recycle plastic toothbrushes?

Disposable, plastic toothbrushes that you buy at a drugstore aren’t recyclable because they combine different types of plastic that are fused together. This makes recycling in community programs impossible. If you try and recycle your toothbrush chances are it will need to be picked out and then disposed of.

 

The Future of Grin is Green

As we grow, we will continuously improve our environmental footprint. We’re testing a new, biodegradable plastic for our brush heads and will likely switch for our next order.

Our donations to the Ocean legacy Foundation also means that for every Grin toothbrush we sell, we donate $1 to help them remove 120 grams—about 5 plastic toothbrushes—worth of plastic snd debris from our oceans and environment.

But what about Electric Toothbrushes?

Unfortunately, electric toothbrushes are a bit of an environmental nightmare. The combination of so much plastic, batteries and non-recyclable brush heads means that they have a massive environmental footprint, even compared to plastic manual toothbrushes from the drugstore.

Thanks for reading! Let me know your thoughts by leaving a comment.

Simon Cooper

 

 

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